Living in the Trump Zone

Today, Paul Krugman had an excellent op-ed in the NY Times called “Living in the Trump Zone.”  In this piece he references an episode of the “Twilight Zone” called “It’s a Good Life.”  He notes that if you watch that episode you will get a good feel for what life is like in a country governed by Trump.

 

He says the following:

 

“Fans of old TV series may remember a classic “Twilight Zone” episode titled “It’s a Good Life.” It featured a small town terrorized by a 6-year-old who for some reason had monstrous superpowers, coupled with complete emotional immaturity. Everyone lived in constant fear, made worse by the need to pretend that everything was fine. After all, any hint of discontent could bring terrible retribution.

 

And now you know what it must be like working in the Trump administration. Actually, it feels a bit like that just living in Trump’s America.”

 

What set Krugman off was his reaction to the one-page bullet list called Trump’s “Tax Plan” which Krugman describes as embarrassing. Krugman asks “So why would the White House release such an embarrassing document?”  My answer to that is BECAUSE WHEN TRUMP WAS BORN HE HAD A GENETIC ABNORMALITY – HE WAS BORN WITH A MISSING EMBARRASSMENT GENE!

 

In any case, I present for you Krugman’s piece in today’s Times and then for your viewing pleasure I have made available The Twilight Zone episode called “It’s a Good Life.”  Enjoy!

 

LIVING IN THE TRUMP ZONE

PAUL KRUGMAN  NY TIMES APRIL 28, 2017

 

Fans of old TV series may remember a classic “Twilight Zone” episode titled “It’s a Good Life.” It featured a small town terrorized by a 6-year-old who for some reason had monstrous superpowers, coupled with complete emotional immaturity. Everyone lived in constant fear, made worse by the need to pretend that everything was fine. After all, any hint of discontent could bring terrible retribution.

 

And now you know what it must be like working in the Trump administration. Actually, it feels a bit like that just living in Trump’s America.

 

What set me off on this chain of association? The answer may surprise you; it was the tax “plan” the administration released on Wednesday.

 

The reason I use scare quotes here is that the single-page document the White House circulated this week bore no resemblance to what people normally mean when they talk about a tax plan. True, a few tax rates were mentioned — but nothing was said about the income thresholds at which these rates apply.

 

Meanwhile, the document said something about eliminating tax breaks, but didn’t say which. For example, would the tax exemption for 401(k) retirement accounts be preserved? The answer, according to the White House, was yes, or maybe no, or then again yes, depending on whom you asked and when you asked.

 

So if you were looking for a document that you could use to estimate, even roughly, how much a given individual would end up paying, sorry.

 

It’s clear the White House is proposing huge tax breaks for corporations and the wealthy, with the breaks especially big for people who can bypass regular personal taxes by channeling their income into tax-privileged businesses — people, for example, named Donald Trump. So Trump plans to blow up the deficit bigly, largely to his own personal benefit; but that’s about all we know.

 

So why would the White House release such an embarrassing document? Why would the Treasury Department go along with this clown show?

 

Unfortunately, we know the answer. Every report from inside the White House conveys the impression that Trump is like a temperamental child, bored by details and easily frustrated when things don’t go his way; being an effective staffer seems to involve finding ways to make him feel good and take his mind off news that he feels makes him look bad.

 

If he says he wants something, no matter how ridiculous, you say, “Yes, Mr. President!”; at most, you try to minimize the damage.

 

Right now, by all accounts, the child-man in chief is in a snit over the prospect of news stories that review his first 100 days and conclude that he hasn’t achieved much if anything (because he hasn’t). So last week he announced the imminent release of something he could call a tax plan.

 

According to The Times, this left Treasury staff — who were nowhere near having a plan ready to go — “speechless.” But nobody dared tell him it couldn’t be done. Instead, they released … something, with nobody sure what it means.

 

And the absence of a real tax plan isn’t the only thing the inner circle apparently doesn’t dare tell him.

 

Obviously, nobody has yet dared to tell Trump that he did something both ludicrous and vile by accusing President Barack Obama of wiretapping his campaign; instead, administration officials spent weeks trying to come up with something, anything, that would lend substance to the charge.

 

Or consider health care. The attempt to repeal and replace Obamacare failed ignominiously, for very good reasons: After all that huffing and puffing, Republicans couldn’t come up with a better idea. On the contrary, all their proposals would lead to mass loss of coverage and soaring costs for the most vulnerable.

 

Clearly, Trump and company should just let it go and move on to something else. But that would require a certain level of maturity — which is a quality nowhere to be found in this White House. So they just keep at it, with proposals everyone I know calls zombie Trumpcare 2.0, 3.0, and so on.

 

And I don’t even want to think about foreign policy. On the domestic front, soothing the president’s fragile ego with forceful-sounding but incoherent proclamations can do only so much damage; on the international front it’s a good way to stumble into a diplomatic crisis, or even a war.

 

In any case, I’d like to make a plea to my colleagues in the news media: Don’t pretend that this is normal. Let’s not act as if that thing released on Wednesday, whatever it was, was something like, say, the 2001 Bush tax cut; I strongly disapproved of that cut, but at least it was comprehensible. Let’s not pretend that we’re having a real discussion of, say, the growth effects of changes in business tax rates.

 

No, what we’re looking at here isn’t policy; it’s pieces of paper whose goal is to soothe the big man’s temper tantrums. Unfortunately, we may all pay the price of his therapy.

 

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